Category Archives: Fate

Fate

On Being an Artist

Karen Gadient as a Young Artist by Karen Gadient, 2015

As the two-year anniversary of my mother’s death approaches, I’ve felt more and more that I need to say something here:

I’ve hardly written fiction in the last two years.

I’ve always loved art and words. For years, I’d considered myself as much a writer as an artist. I’ve got several completed novels to show for it—all in need of serious editing. I think I just had to get those books out of my system while I struggled with my mother’s illness and other life stresses. I needed to write. I still do, I suppose, but not as a career. It’s a passion and personal—and maybe I’ll write more often if it stays in a journal.

I’ll publish some stories eventually, with covers worthy of them… but for now, they’ll be lovingly placed in the proverbial writer’s trunk. I’m fine with that.

Hopefully, my writer friends will understand. Besides, I’m still—and always will be—a reader! And a writer too, but for myself.

The last two years have changed me for the better. I’ve steered back toward the drive that unites my family, most of whom are artists. In the process of creating fine art, I’ve also rekindled a love for design, which is my actual paid work. I’ve discovered new things to love about the creative process and I wake up every day excited to tackle my to-do list.

My office is now my studio. It’s the best room in the house.

My mother would have been proud. She was an painter and graphic designer herself, before she lost her sight to macular degeneration.

For the first time in many years, I feel absolutely certain about where I’m headed. It’s wonderful.

So, there you go. I don’t post a lot of truly personal stuff online, but my readers here are friends and friends share the big moments and changes in life.

47 Comments

Filed under Art, Blogging, Career, Color, Creativity, Decisions, Family, Fate, Friendship, Graphic Design, Inspiration, Journal, Life, Love, Painting, Writing

Coin Tosses and Novel Choices

Chute Image with Ladder

I promised my husband I’d figure this one out by weekend’s end.

I have two novels that have a chance of seeing the light of published day this year.

Both are science fiction. One is alternate-universe stuff, with lots of comedic touches and a very television-show like feel. The other is more Asimov-ish, but also easy reading, because I come from a background where I started writing scripts long before I ever tried novels.

For a debut novel, I’m overanalyzing which should go first. Concept, marketing, just the general “wow factor”… the less comedic one looks in line for the most success (well, maybe). However, there’s one problem bugging me:

First half of the book feels like a YA novel, as the main character is a teenager. Only I don’t think it’s YA. The second half of the book (and any series books to follow) show the main character as an adult. The book has adult themes.

Anyone reading the first two chapters would never guess that the book evolves straight out of the teen years and right into a sharp reality of a new world.

I can’t change the fact that the main character starts out young and doesn’t stay that way. It’s important to the tale. YET…

He may become an adult, but under his skin, he’s still a teenager.

Tricky to categorize, right?

Truth is, I’m not sure where the edges of YA and adult fiction are these days. Is it still YA if the character is in his 20s and older as the story goes on?

I doubt it. But… geez, it starts out in that category. So. *head-desk*

I’m stalling on this project because I can’t define my audience. I don’t want to set readers up to think they’re getting a YA novel and then leaving bad reviews because they end up with a grown man in a violent world after half a book.

My husband flipped a coin for me on these novels. The coin fell on the floor the first time—unofficial results chose the alternate-universe-semi-comedy. The official coin toss chose the maybe-not-YA-sci-fi.

Which one really won? I still don’t know.

Maybe we need a fresh coin toss.


Anton Chigurh: Just call it.
Gas Station Proprietor: Well, we need to know what we’re calling it for here.
Anton Chigurh: You need to call it. I can’t call it for you. It wouldn’t be fair.
Gas Station Proprietor: I didn’t put nothin’ up.
Anton Chigurh: Yes, you did. You’ve been putting it up your whole life you just didn’t know it. You know what date is on this coin?
Gas Station Proprietor: No.
Anton Chigurh: 1958. It’s been traveling twenty-two years to get here. And now it’s here. And it’s either heads or tails. And you have to say. Call it.
Gas Station Proprietor: Look, I need to know what I stand to win.
Anton Chigurh: Everything.
Gas Station Proprietor: How’s that?
Anton Chigurh: You stand to win everything. Call it.
Gas Station Proprietor: Alright. Heads then.
[Chigurh removes his hand, revealing the coin is indeed heads]
Anton Chigurh: Well done. Don’t put it in your pocket, sir. Don’t put it in your pocket. It’s your lucky quarter.

11 Comments

Filed under Decisions, Fate, Life, Publishing, Science Fiction, Writing